Past Exhibition 2014

2014   2013   2012   2011

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         Group Exhibition / The Kaiju Art              January 10 – January 30

 

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              Carol Crawford  / Time After Time                     May 16 – May 28

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 OLED Lighting Exhibition / Illuminating Calmness April 23 – April 25

 

中央

          Manhattan Skylight /  Mayuko Okada                     June 20 – July 10

 

 

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            Jacek Maczynski / BATHHOUSE                           May 2 – May 15    re

 

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   Otogizoshi – BOKUSAI – / Shoko Kazama      July 18 – August 7

Upcoming Exhibition

Burns-Resobox-WaterMain 4 x 6

Japan – An Island Nation: 1870-1890

Photographs from the Burns Archive

Opening Reception: Friday, September 12, 2014   7:00 – 9:00 pm ◆ Admission: Free

Exhibition: September 12 to October 10, 2014

Download Press Release (PDF)


Exhibition Overview

The Resobox Gallery is proud to present an exhibition of Nineteenth-Century hand-colored photographs of Japanese entrepreneurial class culture from The Burns Archive.

The images in this exhibition showcase the best of Japanese photographs that were made to show the perceived exotic nature of Japan to the West. Several of the great early photographers’ studios are represented, including Kusakabe Kimbei, Felice Beato, and Baron von Stillfried. These photographers, under government supervision, documented the artisans, shopkeepers and workers that made up the bulk of the Japanese middle and working class entrepreneurial society. It was critical for Japanese ‘public relations’ of the era to put a face on Japan’s people and products. They were being exported for the first time to international fairs and expositions. It was through these fairs and photographs that the world was introduced to Japan. These photographs were presented in albums, which tourists brought back to the West.



The Burns Collection

Screen shot 2014-08-22 at 11.43.26 PMStanley B. Burns, MD, FACS a New York City ophthalmologist and Clinical Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry, New York University: Langone Medical Center is an internationally distinguished author, curator, historian, collector, and archivist. In 1975, he began collecting historic photography with an emphasis on unique photographs not available anywhere else. In 1977, he founded The Burns Archive to share his discoveries and began his writing career. Dr. Burns’ collection of vintage photographs (1840-1950) has been generally recognized as the most important private comprehensive collection of early photography.

Dr. Burns began collecting vintage Japanese photographs in 1976. At that time, entire albums that were created for the tourist trade were readily available. Over the years, he published several of the photographs in various magazines, and included the images in his exhibitions on hand-colored photography. During the 1990s, he donated over two hundred of the images to museums, notably in California where museums were particularly interested in Japanese photography. Working with his daughter, Elizabeth, they have produced several exhibits and publications on Japanese photography.

The Burns’ in their research on hand-colored photography were immediately drawn to the work of Japanese colorists. While it was the beauty of the images that first attracted their attention, the subject matter soon intrigued them. They began concentrating on various topics such as Geisha, Samurai, and occupational images.
Hand-colored photographs were individually painted and were often printed on order; therefore identical photographs could look entirely different. Attribution of the photographs has been a perplexing subject, as photographers because of travel restrictions traded copy negatives so that professionals in each city had a full range of photographs for sale.

In 2006, Dr. Burns and Elizabeth produced their book on Geisha and Oiran. One objective was to explain the nature of each occupation. The published photographs focused on showing the difference in clothing and how the tying of the obi clearly distinguished these women. Geisha with an elaborate obi tied with a large bow in back and Oiran with an obi tied in front.

In the current exhibit Dr. Burns and Elizabeth continue their expose with occupational photography in Japan. The photographs taken by noted commercial photographers document colorful shops, street vendors and a variety of artisans and workers posed in studio settings. The images offer a glimpse into the working world of Meiji Japan 1868-1912.
Burns Archive: http://www.burnsarchive.com/


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Screen shot 2014-08-22 at 11.35.45 PMScreen shot 2014-08-22 at 11.36.57 PM

Off the Queensboro Bridge Meet Asian Artists in LIC

 Indrajeet Chandrachud,A Deadline And My Friend The Moon

                                                             Indrajeet Chandrachud


RESOBOX hosts a group exhibition featuring

Asian and Asian American Artists who work or

lives in Long Island City area, Queens.

 

Exhibition Date: May 15 (Wed.) to June 5 (Wed.), 2013

** We will extend the exhibition period after LIC Arts Open!

 

Opening reception: May 16 (Thu.) 8-10 pm. LIC Arts Open Queensboro area night! 

There will be an live music show featuring ASIA at 7 pm- see the event page: http://resobox.com/516-stray-asian-people/

Photos - Opening Party

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Participated artists Eleen Lin

Justin Baldwin
Indrajeet Chandrachud

Ayakoh Furukawa
Jae Yoon Kim
Eleen Lin
Sanpo Matsumoto
Henry Minata
Akemi Takeda
Jackie (Hui Lin) Zhu

This exhibition is curated by Ayakoh Furukawa.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Eleen Lin

by Henri MinataSilk Building, Akemi Takeda

                       Henry Minata                                                                                            Akemi Takeda

Opening Party – MIEKO ANEKAWA SOLO EXHIBITION

2

 

April 12th – May 2nd, 2013

 

“Anekawa’s works demonstrate a curious combination of the ability to immerse the viewer into her wonder-world,

but also render them as mere objective perceivers at the same time. The visual tension within her works lends her images a distinctive power.”

“Her compositional perfection shows she is working in the Nihon-ga tradition,

yet her attempt at abstraction also show her attempt of violently breaking away from preconceived notions of art. Anekawa wishes to explore the combination of tradition and the rejection of tradition in her future works as well.”

—Erin.K

Click here to read a full review   

 

Opening Reception: 4/12 (Fri) 7:00 – 9:00 pm

reso.anekawa.4

 

Featuring:
Live painting by Mieko Anekawa with performance by Hito+(plus) & Water Brain
Collaborative art installation with Ikebana artist, Akiyo Sano (Akiyo’s comment for the collaboration)

 

 

 

 

 

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Mieko Anekawa:

Mieko Anekawa studied Graphic communication design in Kyoto, Japan. She moved to New York in 2004 and has become involved in various art and design fields. Her art has been in galleries in Chelsea, Tribeca, the Meatpacking District, Queens, and Brooklyn, and she has had international exhibitions in Canada, Amsterdam, Belgium, UK, Osaka, and Tokyo. Mieko’s art has been reviewed as “contemporary, surrealism style that has somewhat of a pop art sense, a bold abstracted graphic quality.”  Mieko resides in Astoria and paints for work and pleasure. Her artwork combines a number of influences, including fashion, nature, female expression, Japanese culture and NYC life.

Web: http://miekomieko.com/

 

 

MIEKO ANEKAWA SOLO EXHIBITION

2

 

April 12th – May 2nd, 2013

 

“Anekawa’s works demonstrate a curious combination of the ability to immerse the viewer into her wonder-world,

but also render them as mere objective perceivers at the same time. The visual tension within her works lends her images a distinctive power.”

“Her compositional perfection shows she is working in the Nihon-ga tradition,

yet her attempt at abstraction also show her attempt of violently breaking away from preconceived notions of art. Anekawa wishes to explore the combination of tradition and the rejection of tradition in her future works as well.”

—Erin.K

Click here to read a full review   

 

Opening Reception: 4/12 (Fri) 7:00 – 9:00 pm

reso.anekawa.4

 

Featuring:
Live painting by Mieko Anekawa with performance by Hito+(plus) & Water Brain
Collaborative art installation with Ikebana artist, Akiyo Sano (Akiyo’s comment for the collaboration)

 

 

 

 

 

3

Mieko Anekawa:

Mieko Anekawa studied Graphic communication design in Kyoto, Japan. She moved to New York in 2004 and has become involved in various art and design fields. Her art has been in galleries in Chelsea, Tribeca, the Meatpacking District, Queens, and Brooklyn, and she has had international exhibitions in Canada, Amsterdam, Belgium, UK, Osaka, and Tokyo. Mieko’s art has been reviewed as “contemporary, surrealism style that has somewhat of a pop art sense, a bold abstracted graphic quality.”  Mieko resides in Astoria and paints for work and pleasure. Her artwork combines a number of influences, including fashion, nature, female expression, Japanese culture and NYC life.

Web: http://miekomieko.com/

 

 

3/15 Opening Party – WASTED by Alex White-Mazzarella

wasted II

 

Alex White-Mazzarella Exhibition — “WASTED”

3/15 (Fri) — 4/4 (Thu)

Opening Reception: 3/15 (Fri)   7:00-9:00pm at RESOBOX Gallery

 

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Resobox Gallery proudly presents political works from Alex White Mazzarella, artist and
Founder of global social art initiative Artefacting. A collection of 17 mixed media paintings and a short video explore WASTED as a landscape, way of life, and social condition.

Large canvases collage lottery tickets, food packaging, and images of nature with colorful paint and pastel to create stories. Portraits of oil drums convert waste into aesthetic loot. Shadow populations are surveyed behind bars and people combine with abandoned rubber tires in metamorphosis. And in the 2011 performance video “Computer Man” the consumer awakes in a far distant land to discover the world that processes and recycles his composition.

The work was created during residencies in Brooklyn, Mumbai and Detroit.

Exhibition visitors will be able to define WASTED for themselves and later see the artist turn the
discourse into a collaborative artwork.

What is wasted? What is not wasted? What can’t be wasted? Why do we get wasted?

 

 Civic. Mental. Material

 

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WASTED In Context

I’ve been staring at this computer screen for days but now, finally, I can go out and get WASTED

Nearly $6 billion spent for the 2012 presidential campaign. Economic production or WASTED

Our Global cities and their material incarnations swell and multiply. But how fast can we run to avoid getting WASTED

The Kyoto Protocol. A chance to curb climate change WASTED?

The waste management facility in Long Island City is expanding to process up to 2,100 tons of waste a day. WASTED

 

 

 

Alex White Mazzarella

12

Born in Boston, USA in 1979, a lifelong artist, he graduated university with degrees in economics and city planning before setting off to Barcelona and consequently Hong Kong to shape his art within the realms of street art and contemporary urban culture. Nurtured by Larry Poons, Phillip Sherrod and Hug Bastidas of the Art Students League, he has been exhibiting his paintings and artwork in New York and abroad since being discovered by Richard Temperio of the Sideshow Gallery. His work has been exhibited at the Queens Museum of Art and India Design Forum.

His 2010 work “Beehive” is in the private collection of the Coimbatore Centre for Contemporary Art (CoCCA) and his work has been featured by likes of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Time Out. He founded Artefacting in 2010 as a global social arts initiative dedicated to stimulating community cohesion, dialogue and social justice.

He sparked Artefacting as a practice of creating art with diverse communities and audiences worldwide as a tool to bridge differences, open perspective, and manifest cultural undercurrents.

 

Web:http://www.lamazza.com/

 

 

 

WASTED

wasted II

 

Alex White-Mazzarella Exhibition — “WASTED”

3/15 (Fri) — 4/4 (Thu)

Opening Reception: 3/15 (Fri)   7:00-9:00pm at RESOBOX Gallery

 

e256f169b1_940_wide

Resobox Gallery proudly presents political works from Alex White Mazzarella, artist and
Founder of global social art initiative Artefacting. A collection of 17 mixed media paintings and a short video explore WASTED as a landscape, way of life, and social condition.

Large canvases collage lottery tickets, food packaging, and images of nature with colorful paint and pastel to create stories. Portraits of oil drums convert waste into aesthetic loot. Shadow populations are surveyed behind bars and people combine with abandoned rubber tires in metamorphosis. And in the 2011 performance video “Computer Man” the consumer awakes in a far distant land to discover the world that processes and recycles his composition.

The work was created during residencies in Brooklyn, Mumbai and Detroit.

Exhibition visitors will be able to define WASTED for themselves and later see the artist turn the
discourse into a collaborative artwork.

What is wasted? What is not wasted? What can’t be wasted? Why do we get wasted?

 

 Civic. Mental. Material

 

35bd674f43_940_wide

WASTED In Context

I’ve been staring at this computer screen for days but now, finally, I can go out and get WASTED

Nearly $6 billion spent for the 2012 presidential campaign. Economic production or WASTED

Our Global cities and their material incarnations swell and multiply. But how fast can we run to avoid getting WASTED

The Kyoto Protocol. A chance to curb climate change WASTED?

The waste management facility in Long Island City is expanding to process up to 2,100 tons of waste a day. WASTED

 

 

 

Alex White Mazzarella

12

Born in Boston, USA in 1979, a lifelong artist, he graduated university with degrees in economics and city planning before setting off to Barcelona and consequently Hong Kong to shape his art within the realms of street art and contemporary urban culture. Nurtured by Larry Poons, Phillip Sherrod and Hug Bastidas of the Art Students League, he has been exhibiting his paintings and artwork in New York and abroad since being discovered by Richard Temperio of the Sideshow Gallery. His work has been exhibited at the Queens Museum of Art and India Design Forum.

His 2010 work “Beehive” is in the private collection of the Coimbatore Centre for Contemporary Art (CoCCA) and his work has been featured by likes of the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Time Out. He founded Artefacting in 2010 as a global social arts initiative dedicated to stimulating community cohesion, dialogue and social justice.

He sparked Artefacting as a practice of creating art with diverse communities and audiences worldwide as a tool to bridge differences, open perspective, and manifest cultural undercurrents.

 

Web:http://www.lamazza.com/

 

 

 

2/4 New exhibition – vintage kimono and doll

kimono

An Elegant Rustling of Silk

The sensuality of fabrics is one thing that photographs, especially early photographs, cannot
totally reveal. This sumptuousness — the elegant look and feel of fine silk — was, and still
is, one essential part of that sense of “mysterious cool” that is so admired. We can look at
fabrics from the Taisho era in the form of kimono that belonged to an elegant lady. This is
a totally different kind of fashion show. Rather than dwelling on the seasons, or on types of
kimono, thanks to the generosity of the Asano Collection, we will go back to a time when
the only synthetic fabric, rayon, was a novelty.

 

asano

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About Washi Dolls:

Washi is the light, strong traditional Japanese paper made by hand from plant fibers. The word washi literally means “Japanese paper”. Today most paper in Japan is made in large automated mills, but a few hundred families in rural villages continue to make washi by hand in the traditional manner.
In this exhibition, the washi was formed into ningyo or dolls by a master artist about 30 years ago. These are not just any dolls, though. Each doll in the exhibition represents a Kabuki play or dance-drama. We’ll take a look at these extraordinary dolls, their costumes, and the Kabuki plays they represent.

 

15-1

February 4 (mon)– February 17 (sun)

Special lecture by Helen E. Moss   –Feb 14,  7:00PM

Free Admission

Lecture by Helen E. Moss

The Shimmer of Silk
One thing old photographs from Japan cannot do is to show us the shimmer of the silk worn in them. In order to get the feeling of the real thing, we have to look at and examine elegant silk kimono. Almost unbelievably, there was a time when synthetic fabrics like polyester simply didn’t exist. Can we even imagine it? Join us on Valentine’s Day for a hands-on lecture as we enjoy the luxurious feeling of natural fibers. Find out the difference between real and fake shibori, between the concepts of hade and shibui, and about some of the textile designs, materials and techniques.
Afterwards, we’ll enjoy a bit of chocolate and champagne!

 

Helen Moss (Fujima Nishiki-no 藤間錦乃) teaches and performs Japanese classical dance in the elegant Soke Fujima style.
As a “spokesdancer,” she has given workshops and lecture /demonstrations to introduce people of all ages to the beauty of dance and Japanese culture throughout the New York area, recently leading an artist-in-residency series of workshops at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania.

Ms. Moss writes and performs concert narration explaining the dances to increase the audience’s understanding and enjoyment. A classically-trained violinist/violist, she has a unique approach to teaching Japanese dance musically to non-Japanese students, enabling them to better interpret the dance.

Ms. Moss is the founding Secretary and one of the instructors with IchiFuji-kai Dance Association, a multicultural non-profit organization representing the Soke Fujima style in the greater New York City area.

 

1-11-31-4

 

Vintage kimono and doll exhibition

kimono

An Elegant Rustling of Silk

The sensuality of fabrics is one thing that photographs, especially early photographs, cannot
totally reveal. This sumptuousness — the elegant look and feel of fine silk — was, and still
is, one essential part of that sense of “mysterious cool” that is so admired. We can look at
fabrics from the Taisho era in the form of kimono that belonged to an elegant lady. This is
a totally different kind of fashion show. Rather than dwelling on the seasons, or on types of
kimono, thanks to the generosity of the Asano Collection, we will go back to a time when
the only synthetic fabric, rayon, was a novelty.

 

asano

11-1

About Washi Dolls:

Washi is the light, strong traditional Japanese paper made by hand from plant fibers. The word washi literally means “Japanese paper”. Today most paper in Japan is made in large automated mills, but a few hundred families in rural villages continue to make washi by hand in the traditional manner.
In this exhibition, the washi was formed into ningyo or dolls by a master artist about 30 years ago. These are not just any dolls, though. Each doll in the exhibition represents a Kabuki play or dance-drama. We’ll take a look at these extraordinary dolls, their costumes, and the Kabuki plays they represent.

 

15-1

February 4 (mon)– February 17 (sun)

Special lecture by Helen E. Moss   –Feb 14,  7:00PM

Free Admission

Lecture by Helen E. Moss

The Shimmer of Silk
One thing old photographs from Japan cannot do is to show us the shimmer of the silk worn in them. In order to get the feeling of the real thing, we have to look at and examine elegant silk kimono. Almost unbelievably, there was a time when synthetic fabrics like polyester simply didn’t exist. Can we even imagine it? Join us on Valentine’s Day for a hands-on lecture as we enjoy the luxurious feeling of natural fibers. Find out the difference between real and fake shibori, between the concepts of hade and shibui, and about some of the textile designs, materials and techniques.
Afterwards, we’ll enjoy a bit of chocolate and champagne!

 

Helen Moss (Fujima Nishiki-no 藤間錦乃) teaches and performs Japanese classical dance in the elegant Soke Fujima style.
As a “spokesdancer,” she has given workshops and lecture /demonstrations to introduce people of all ages to the beauty of dance and Japanese culture throughout the New York area, recently leading an artist-in-residency series of workshops at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania.

Ms. Moss writes and performs concert narration explaining the dances to increase the audience’s understanding and enjoyment. A classically-trained violinist/violist, she has a unique approach to teaching Japanese dance musically to non-Japanese students, enabling them to better interpret the dance.

Ms. Moss is the founding Secretary and one of the instructors with IchiFuji-kai Dance Association, a multicultural non-profit organization representing the Soke Fujima style in the greater New York City area.

 

1-11-31-4

 

2/22 Opening Party – RGB by Satoshi Tsuchiyama

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2/22 – 3/6 2013

Opening Reception: Febuary 22th at 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

 

 

 

 

It was my terror and entertainment that are made with the various shapes, their movements and the three colors of lights.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That day, March 11th 2011, I was not there when the earthquake hit Japan. I was here in New York, far away from my home country. The scenes of tsunami waves swallowing the towns of Tohoku and Eastern Kantou were broadcasted on American News channels. It was as if I was watching one of the Hollywood disaster movies. There was no difference that I could see from actors and the news reporters. The cars were like toys. The true tragedy seemed to have a face of entertainment. The sublime power of the chaos was taking over what people there had built, the order. I was fascinated with the overwhelming abstractions and assemblage with various materials, wondering how many RGB lights on the large TV-flat screen. What information or emotion did each light convey?

 

 

 

 

 

About the Artist:

Satoshi Tsuchiyama

After 20 years of the first chapter of his life in Japan, Tsuchiyama decided to move to the U.S. He learned Visual Studies at SUNY University at Buffalo and completed a certificate program at International Center of Photography. His art is a hybrid of photography, video and installation that explores the notion of uncanny and absurdity in the urban dystopian situation. Currently, he lives and works in New York.

www.satoshitsuchiyama.com

 

Technical Superviser:

Taezoo Park

A Brooklyn based interactive media artist and designer, recently graduated with an M.F.A. in Pratt’s Digital Arts program. Specialties include developing interactive media; creating engaging UXs by taking user experiences into social and cultural contexts.